Thursday May 12

We were planning to stay and explore and snorkel some more and do an overnighter to Chukai. However, the breeze was up early making for a jiggly anchorage so we headed off. Enjoyed 3 hours of nice sailing before engine had to be turned on. Breeze soon returned and we sailed lazily onward. Esoterica and Court Jester anchored for the night on a sandbank in the middle of nowhere. We decided to keep wafting along and anchored off the beach just south of the Chukai River Entrance at 0200. Thankfully we encountered no FAD's or nets.

Friday May 13

Entered the River and motored a few miles up passed all the Rally boats anchored along the Riverbank. We found a spot right off the town centre. We were near Allure of NZ and she was misbehaving and moving all over the place to the opposing tune of current and wind. We moved a bit further away.

The call to prayer was loud which did not bode well for the 0430 wake up call. The heat was stifling as we went ashore and had a look around this busy port town.

Wealth from oil revenues has been spent on some interesting architecture

The Stainless Steel work done here is amazing.

And the fruit markets fantastic

We went back into town for fuel and then again for dinner with John and Kerryn. Great Chinese food. The people, especially the kids were very friendly.
At high tide in the afternoonwe were able to go up a small tributary to get close to the Petrol station and get 110 litres of deisel.

Early night with loud karaoke music as a lullaby.

Saturday 14 May

Coach tour today of the next province to the south. First stop was traditional Malasian breakfast at a roadside stop. We had already had breakfast but we tucked in again to some delicious local food. We are finding the food on the East Coast much betterthan the West Coast.

Our tour guide was very good and gave us a running commentary of the history ofthe areas we would be visiting Next stop was a Government funded Turtle Hatchery. With its small blue and white tiled pools it was like stepping back into the 1970's.

We continued on to Sungai Lembing. This was a major tin mine many years and was the Japanese centre of government during the WWII ocupation. The mine remained productive until the fall in tin price in the 1980's forced its closure. The mine superintants house. was beautifully preserved and the museum was excellent.
The mine is. the second largest underground tin mine in the world with 332 km of tunnelsto a depth of 700m. The British ran the mine successfully with over 1400 workers employed. After the mine closed in the 1980's a tempoary rise in tin prices in the 1990's had locals sneaking into the old mine and extracting hundreds of tonnes of tin from the mother lode creating a huge cavern in the process.
We toured the tunnels which have been set up well for tourism.

 

 

Lunch followed at a local Restaraunt, then on to a Batik Factory where we watch the different processes for making the patterns on the material.
Hand Painting
Hot wax to stop the dye penetrating areas. After dyeing the wax is removed with boiling water.

Pattern irons dipped in molten wax applied to the fabric.

It was a most enjoyable and interesting day. Our thanks to The Ministry of Tourism Pahang Province for organising it all for us.

To finish the buses pulled into a local supermarket so that we could buy some more provisions. Finished the day with another great meal ashore after dropping off the laundry at the local “doby”, laundry service.

Sunday May 15

A morning of housekeeping. Dropped the crew ashore to pick up the laundry and some outboard fuel. All Lea's credit on her phone has disappeared so she hoped to sort that as well. Tide was very low which made access to the river steps very difficult.

All organised by midday so we headed out of the river along with many of the fleet. A light NE breeze held us to the coast so we anchored late afternoon in a small bay with Meridian after dodging lots of fishing nets, Oil Rig support vessels and passing through the restricted area around the Kemaman Refinery.

Phil and Helen joined us for sundowners.

 

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